FTPS Hosting : Compare Hosting

Showing top 10 results Show All

Oops! No Hosting Plans Match Your Search

You've selected a combination of features that none of the web hosts we profile offer. We suggest you remove your last filter or reset & start again.

Ask Our Experts

Need help with your hosting? Tell us exactly what you are looking for and we’ll do our very best to help. Please allow one working day for a response.

Please fill in all fields.

Thanks! Your request has been sent. We'll reply within 24 hours.

Filtering by:
  • FTPS
Reset

What is FTPS?

FTPS is a security extension to File Transfer Protocol (FTP). As a protective measure, it uses a security protocol to guard against tampering when data is sent over a public network (such as the Internet). Some hosting plans allow FTPS access, while others do not - but most will allow some form of File Transfer Protocol - or a similarly secure alternative.

About FTPS

FTPS is also known as FTP-ES, FTP-SSL and FTP-Secure. In order to understand the value of what FTPS is, first one must understand how data transport works on the internet.

The internet is a series of switches tossing around packets - each packet has a header (or control  information) which indicates what type of packet is being sent, how and to who - and a "Payload" (or bit stream). Assuming these principles - certain packets conform to standards which are known to both the sender and recipient of a data packet. This is the basic cornerstone of how the internet works.

The internet model, broken into layers, has hardware controlling a datalink and network access - which enables the network layer and communication between devices. On top of this is stacked the transport layer - this is where  Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) allows network coordination of Internet Protocol (IP) - which is where a computer's address is stored. File Transfer Protocol (FTP) - which is the basis of FTPS - is a network protocol for controlling data streams for sending individual files across a network.

FTP has existed since the early 1970's - for use in ARPANET, then, FTP adopted TCP/IP in the 80's, and by the mid 90's, security features were finally beginning to be added. In order to make FTP safer for the transfer of sensitive information, encryption securities were proposed and enacted in the 1990s.

Because the Internet was growing, user communication increased, as did the potential for eavesdropping. Netscape came up with the concept known as the Secure Socket Layer (SSL) in 1994 - which is an encryption protocol which protects user data from unauthorized third parties. SSL is actually a wrapper for the Application Layer - which is the most abstracted level of internet protocol.

With SSL, and later with Transport Layer Security (TLS) - data streams become encrypted and cannot be read without having the decryption keys. This is used commonly for websites which require sensitive user data over Hyper Text Transfer Protocol (HTTP) - but the same principles can be applied to FTP - which means that files can be sent from one storage location to another, without a third party being capable of knowing what files are being transferred. FTPS is simply a version of FTP which uses TLS and SSL for security.

The secure versions of FTP include FTPS, Implicit SSL and FTPS Explicit SSL. With implicit mode, security is established and in place before any data transfer happens. If a client attempts to connect without SSL encryption, the server refuses the request. Explicit mode, however, allows the client and server to negotiate the security level. The server is able to accept both encrypted and unencrypted requests.

FTPS in Applications

FTP may indicate either a method for sending files or the program that performs the actual sending. The protocol itself is one of the oldest means of sending and accessing files on the Internet, and you must still access an FTP server to upload files to, or download files from, a website. This is especially helpful for webmasters who do not use a content management system (CMS).

The majority of web hosts will allow for FTP access - which is generally over secure FTPS access. It is very rare to find a host which does not support it - unless they are using a different but similar technology like WebDAV or Secure Shell (SSH) Protocol.

It's important to note that FTPS has nothing to do with the completely different file transfer system, the SSH File Transfer Protocol (SFTP). Several companies offer free and commercial versions of secure FTP clients, which you can install locally and use to transfer files.

The most popular clients include FileZilla, Transmit, and CyberDuck. FTP can also be accessed directly through Windows file explorer if setup correctly. Files can often be dragged and dropped from the FTP client into a folder - and vice versa.

It is common practice to edit files on a local hard drive, and then push updated HTML or content onto the web server over FTP.

What’s the difference between Anonymous FTP and FTPS?

Anonymous FTP is a file transfer protocol system that allows users to download files via regular FTP access without the need for a secure username and password. With this system, every single user will have an FTP account and sign-in access to your site. With today’s high volume websites and wide variety of security concerns, anonymous FTP is not a very practical application for file transfers.

By comparison, FTPS is almost the exact opposite of Anonymous FTP. FTPS is a security extension to File Transfer Protocol, and it guards against tampering when data is sent over a public network. Almost all website hosting providers allow some type of FTP access to their customers - most don’t offer Anonymous FTP today, but FTPS is also not always the required method of file transfer, either. Consult with your hosting provider before you begin uploading and downloading files via FTP if you are unsure what access users have to your server.

FTPS and FTP are so old - are they still important?

Roads and bridges are a very old concept, but we still use them. Throughout the previous century, humanity learned how to create asphalt, manage steel enforced beams - and generally made bridges safer.

They also made bridges less prone to collapse, and put jersey barriers into freeways to make them safer. This anology applies to the information super-highway just as easily - file transfer protocol has existed longer than a graphical interface operating system. Yet, the core network concepts hav

Is FTPS the only way to send files securely?

No, there are many options available, but each one depends entirely on the operating system available, and/or the type of server being run by your web host. FTP works across multiple operating systems with relative ease.

WebDAV is mostly Microsoft focused, SSH File Transfer Protocol (SFTP) - uses SSH - which is built natively into Linux, but requires special configuration to run on Windows. Alternatively, AtomPub and CMIS offer similar functionality but generally need a higher amount of configuration - and are used for deep infrastructure.

Who uses SFTP?

Anyone! Almost all web hosts have FTP, and many allow for secure transfers. Be sure to ask your provider if TLS/SSL is part of the hosting plan. Most modern hosts should say yes.

FTPS Frequently Asked Questions

WhoIsHostingThis Recommends

★★★★
Support
★★★★
Features
★★★★
Uptime
★★★★
Value
★★★★

Pros: Free domain name , Unlimited traffic, emails, DBs

Cons: No Windows-based plans

SiteGround is an established web host managing well over 1,000 servers and... Read more

Visit host

2. iPage

ipage logo
★★★★
Support
★★★★
Features
★★★★
Uptime
★★★★
Value
★★★★

Pros: Unlimited Disk Space, Bandwidth & Email , Unlimited MySQL Databases

Based in the US, iPage specialises in low-cost shared hosting. Each plan... Read more

Visit host
★★★
Support
★★★
Features
★★★★
Uptime
★★★
Value
★★★

Pros: Free Domain , Unlimited Bandwidth

Bluehost provides customers with low-cost shared hosting, as well as reseller, VPS... Read more

Visit host

Updating...