Best Programming Languages for Math

When it comes to solving math problems, programming languages aren't always used by the average mathematician. They can be utilized for assistance, but it completely depends on the scope of the problem and whether or not there's even a need for a programming language in the first place. More often, the act of programming involves

More often, the act of programming involves problem solving in itself, where you then take your answers and apply them to build a program.

However, mathematicians sometimes require some programming languages for assistance, and some of the best programming languages for math work wonders when you're trying to hone your skills and train yourself in a particular mathematical field. Therefore, keep reading to learn about the most popular programming languages for math, along with what's so special about them, and what makes them good for writing about and solving math problems.

Therefore, keep reading to learn about the most popular programming languages for math, along with what's so special about them, and what makes them good for writing about and solving math problems.

Matlab

The most obvious answer is Matlab, which is a commercial program. Symbolic computation and problem solving come to mind for real-world applications of the popular program. Mathematicians are known to have Matlab in their arsenal, and it's not uncommon for college students to take advantage because they can often get it for free. In addition, it has an impressive set of visual learning tools to see how certain parameters change the solution to a problem.

Mathematicians are known to have Matlab in their arsenal, and it's not uncommon for college students to take advantage because they can often get it for free. In addition, it has an impressive set of visual learning tools to see how certain parameters change the solution to a problem.

Numericists have been known to take advantage of Matlab for similar reasons as industrially-focused mathematicians, seeing as how the numerical interface causes the user to be far more careful with computations.

Python

Python is sometimes considered a programming language meant for math, with a wide variety of users writing programs with Python's assistance. Mathematicians are rather fond of it for some interesting reasons. First of all, Python doesn't actually serve much of a mathematical purpose, but when it comes to general programming, Python shines. That general programming often includes mathematical programs, so it does eventually come in handy for the field.

Finally, some argue that the popularity of so many other programs and programming languages comes from the fact that they are based on Python. For example, Sage is based on Python and it's a wonderful solution for when you're addressing a problem from scratch.

Mathematica

Mathematica is another commercial program utilized by mathematicians on occasion. Although you'll have to pay to use it (it's not open-source,) Mathematica comes in handy when attempting things like plotting and symbolic measures.

Quite a few mathematicians will state that Mathematica is one of those programs best suited for checking an idea or verifying a thought. However, when it comes to writing something that's going to be professional, stable, and effective, they'd most likely go with another program.

R

R offers a comprehensive graphics toolset for designing and implementing beautiful imagery. The majority of the time, you're going to find that statisticians are the ones utilizing R for its incredible statistical computing power. R is an open-source programming language, which makes it even more appealing. Mathematical data miners are also known for using R because you can make all sorts of programs for running through data quickly and mining data without any extra work involved. Because of this, the popularity of R has increased quite a bit in recent years.

Mathematical data miners are also known for using R because you can make all sorts of programs for running through data quickly and mining data without any extra work involved. Because of this, the popularity of R has increased quite a bit in recent years.

Haskell

Haskell is a general programming language that has a wide range of uses, including mathematics. Category theorists like using Haskell. Similar to Mathematica, Haskell does the trick for checking out ideas as opposed to writing a completely new program. One of the main reasons Haskell stands strong among its alternatives is because it's a functional language, making it more natural for mathematicians to understand.

Another argument for Haskell is that more combinatorial problems with other programs like C and C++ can come out rather complicated. On the other hand, Haskell often delivers similar problems with one line.

Ruby

Ruby falls in a similar category as Haskell, allowing math students and mathematicians to prototype different types of code and make their own scripts. Mathematica also falls in this category, where both plotting and symbolic functions are required. The mathematical uses are somewhat limited with Ruby, but people use it all the time for general programming. That said, it does have a more powerful mathematical setup for many other languages.

The mathematical uses are somewhat limited with Ruby, but people use it all the time for general programming. That said, it does have a more powerful mathematical setup for many other languages.

PostScript

As a rather unique math program, PostScript probably won't come up in conversation if you ever ask a mathematician about Matlab alternatives. However, PostScript comes into play when you're trying to make mathematical illustrations in a more precise manner. The average user would most likely consider PostScript a little too ugly to be used consistently, but it does offer elegant syntax, making it a fun and interesting solution for those who want to make illustrations and mathematical constructions. However, some other areas are lacking, such as handling strings and user interaction.

The average user would most likely consider PostScript a little too ugly to be used consistently, but it does offer elegant syntax, making it a fun and interesting solution for those who want to make illustrations and mathematical constructions. However, some other areas are lacking, such as handling strings and user interaction.

C

C and C++ provide multiple uses, so you're not only going to find these in the math field. In fact, they are more general in terms of programming, but they stand strong for mathematical programs. Overall, C has a solid reputation when you're trying to get something done quickly. The processing speed is one of its best qualities, seeing as how many students are known to write small C programs in order to process repetitious problems.

Overall, C has a solid reputation when you're trying to get something done quickly. The processing speed is one of its best qualities, seeing as how many students are known to write small C programs in order to process repetitious problems.

Lisp

There are some tools for advanced math in Lisp, but the main reason you'll find it used in the math field is because of its design. Mathematicians enjoy cleanliness and beauty in both math and design, so it makes sense for them to at least include Lisp in their toolbox.

Maple

Maple has a fairly strong advantage when it comes to combinatorial math problems. It's also known for its functional programming constructs, making it extremely interesting to play around with. Plotting is a breeze when working with Maple, and advanced symbolic functions aren't bad either. Keep in mind that Maple, similar to that of Mathematica and Matlab, is a commercial program, meaning that you'll have to pay for it.

Plotting is a breeze when working with Maple, and advanced symbolic functions aren't bad either. Keep in mind that Maple, similar to that of Mathematica and Matlab, is a commercial program, meaning that you'll have to pay for it.

Choosing the Right Math Language

As you can see, the type of mathematics programming language you go with primarily depends on the problem, idea, or program you're trying to work on. For example, Matlab looks strong for symbolic computation, while R does the trick for statistics. Overall, you're more likely to see mathematicians and students taking advantage of a handful of these

Overall, you're more likely to see mathematicians and students taking advantage of a handful of these programming languages. Best of luck making a decision!